Asian Family Violence Report

A Study of the Chinese, Cambodian, Korean, South Asian, and Vietnamese Communities in Massachusetts

  • 24% of Chinese surveyed know a woman who has been physically abused or injured by her partner

  • 61% of Chinese surveyed were hit regularly by their parents when they were growing up

  • 9% of the respondents know a man who is being beaten by his partner

  • For help, Chinese respondents said a woman should turn to: police (59%), friends (42%), family members (34%), shelter (36%). 18% say the woman shouldn't tell anyone.

  • Older Chinese respondents were more tolerant of the use of force and saw more situations in which violence is justified.

  • Younger Chinese respondents were less likely to see divorce, leaving the abuser, or arrest as viable alternatives than older respondents.
  • 47% of Cambodians surveyed know a woman who has been physically abused or injured by her partner
  • 70% of Cambodians surveyed were hit regularly by their parents when they were growing up
  • 37% of the respondents know a man who is being beaten by his partnerFor help, Cambodians stated that a battered woman should turn to: people vulnerable to stress and police (47%), friends (44%), family members (23%), hotline (22%). 22% of respondents said the woman shouldn't tell anyone.
  • Cambodian respondents overall do not believe that women have the right to divorce, leave a husband who hits her, or that the husband should be arrested.

  • Focus group members felt that the genocide has made many people vulnerable to stress and depression, which may play a role in domestic violence.
  • 32% of Korean surveyed know a woman who has been physically abused or injured by her partner

  • 80% of the respondents were hit regularly by their parents when they were growing up

  • 3% of the respondents know a man who is being beaten by his partner

  • Koreans said a battered woman should turn to a friend for help (41%), but felt that a woman should turn to a family member (29%), not tell anyone (29%).

  • Korean men surveyed hold attitudes that support domestic violence more than women.

  • Focus group expressed that Koreans experience a feeling of powerlessness because they are immigrants. As a result they exert power in their home, taking out their frustration on someone who who has even less power.
  • 44% of South Asians surveyed know a woman who has been physically abused or injured by her partner

  • 79% of the respondents were hit regularly by their parents when they were growing up

  • 5% of the respondents know a man who is being beaten by his partner

  • South Asian respondents endorsed help seeking more than any other Asian group surveyed. 82% said that a battered woman should tell a friend, call the police (74%), tell a family member (66%), turn to a shelter (50%) or therapist (48%). Only 5% said the woman shouldn't tell anyone.

  • Focus group members felt that the woman in marriage becomes the property of her husband and no longer belongs to her parents. A woman can not turn to her own family for help once she is married and parents are not supposed to intervene in the daughter's marriage.

  • Focus Group felt that in-laws play a critical role in 'family violence' within South Asian families especially in cases of dowry disputes.
  • 39% of Vietnamese surveyed know a woman who has been physically abused or injured by her partner

  • 72% of the respondents were hit regularly by their parents when they were growing up

  • 22% of the respondents know a man who is being beaten by his partner

  • For help, Vietnamese respondents said a battered woman should turn to: police (49%), therapist (31%), shelter (29%), friend (29 %). Telling family members (17%) ranks lower than turning to social service and law enforcement professionals.

  • Vietnamese respondents overall believe that a man has the right to discipline his wife, can expect sex whenever he wants it, is the ruler of his home, or that wives deserve beatings.

  • Vietnamese respondents overall believe that women do not have the right to divorce, leave a husband who hits her and/or that the husband should be arrested.

For full text of report CLICK HERE.

Prepared by:

  • Marianne R. Yoshioka Ph.D. M.S.W. Columbia University, School of Social Work
  • Quynh Dang
  • Nanda Shewmangal
  • Carmen Chan
  • Rev. Cheng Imm Tan

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